Maurice Sendak, Where the Wild Things Are (Harper & Row), 1963.

Maurice Sendak, Where the Wild Things Are (Harper & Row), 1963.

(Source: magictransistor, via boner-iver)

But rarely do you ever tell people about the true depths of your loneliness, about how you feel more and more alienated from your friends each passing day and you’re not sure how to fix it. It seems like everyone is just better at living than you are.

Ryan O’Connell

oh holy shit

(via knervous)

(Source: splitterherzen, via panoramiclettuce)

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misstotallyawesome:

the new Guardians of the Galaxy still looks amazing

misstotallyawesome:

the new Guardians of the Galaxy still looks amazing

(via panoramiclettuce)

sagansense:

currentsinbiology:

Young Scientists Say They’re Sexually Abused In The Field (NPR)

In a survey of scientists engaged in field research, the majority — 64 percent — said they had personally experienced sexual harassment while at a field site, and 22 percent reported being the victim of sexual assault.
Most of the people reporting harassment or assault were women, and the vast majority were still students or postdocs.
And for female victims, the perpetrator was more likely to be a superior, not a peer. “This is happening to them when they are trainees, when they are most vulnerable within the academic hierarchy,” says evolutionary biologist Katie Hinde , an author on the study in PLOS ONE. Hinde and her colleagues say this could be a factor in the large number of women who enter scientific fields but don’t continue.

Students work at an archaeological dig near Silchester, England.

In/outside and on/off the field, this is utterly disturbing and unacceptable.

sagansense:

currentsinbiology:

Young Scientists Say They’re Sexually Abused In The Field (NPR)

In a survey of scientists engaged in field research, the majority — 64 percent — said they had personally experienced sexual harassment while at a field site, and 22 percent reported being the victim of sexual assault.

Most of the people reporting harassment or assault were women, and the vast majority were still students or postdocs.

And for female victims, the perpetrator was more likely to be a superior, not a peer. “This is happening to them when they are trainees, when they are most vulnerable within the academic hierarchy,” says evolutionary biologist Katie Hinde , an author on the study in PLOS ONE. Hinde and her colleagues say this could be a factor in the large number of women who enter scientific fields but don’t continue.

Students work at an archaeological dig near Silchester, England.

In/outside and on/off the field, this is utterly disturbing and unacceptable.

(Source: , via my-mind-is-tripping)